Charting The Growth Of NYCs Tallest Residential Towers

Dated: 08/24/2015

Views: 475

 Monday, August 24, 2015, by Amy Plitt

[The Waldorf Astoria was the tallest residential building in NYC for more than 50 years. Photo by Marco Rubino / Shutterstock.com.]


With its latest exhibit, "Ten Tops," the Skyscraper Museum is looking at the tallest buildings in the world—according to the parameters they've put into place, that means structures that exceed the 100-story mark, including One World Trade Centerand the Empire State Building. Earlier this year, the museum launched a digital exhibition to accompany the IRL one, which includes a virtual timeline of the tallest structures throughout history. And now, they've created lists of "alternative" top tens—things like the top ten residential towers in New York City, or the tallest observation decks around the world—to show how supertall buildings are used globally.


skyscraper_museum_top10_residential.jpg[The consecutive towers that claimed the record for New York's tallest residential building. Blue denotes residential use, purple is hotel, green is office, and red is retail. Via the Skyscraper Museum.]


The graphic of the ten tallest residential buildings in NYC's history starts with theSherry-Netherland Hotel, which topped out at 570 feet when it was completed in 1927 (and was quickly replaced by the Waldorf Astoria Hotel in 1931), and ends with the still-under-construction Central Park Tower (formerly the Nordstrom Tower), which is expected to stand at around 1,800 feet tall when it's completed. (Though considering the issues with renderings that Extell has been having lately, who knows if this will remain accurate).

HOF.jpg[The tallest residential towers in New York City, completed by 2018. From Left: 15 Hudson Yards, 30 Park Place, 220 Central Park South, 70 Pine, One57, 35 Hudson Yards, MoMA Tower, 432 Park Avenue, 111 West 57th Street, Central Park Tower. Via the Skyscraper Museum.]

This graphic, meanwhile, shows the ten tallest buildings in the city that are "current or under construction as of August 2015"; if you hover over the graphic on the museum's site, you can also see the highest occupied floor of each building. The shortest is 15 Hudson Yards, at 914 feet tall (and expected to be finished in 2016); the highest is, again, Central Park Tower, whose highest occupied floor will be a whopping 1,450 above the city.
· Ten Tallest Residential Towers [Skyscraper Museum]


http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2015/08/24/charting_the_growth_of_nycs_tallest_residential_towers.php


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